John Rhodes

A New Terror

A Week after D Day, Hitler unleashes his V1 Flying Bombs against London A week after D Day, on June 12, 1944, Hitler commenced Operation Eisbär, a mass attack on London using his brand-new cruise missile V1 flying bombs. These were revolutionary pilotless cruise...

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Mulberry, the Red Ball Express, (and family secrets)

(Top: ‘Port Winston’ Mulberry B)The D Day landings are rightly remembered for the unflinching bravery of the 150,000 men who took part. But I suggest they should also be remembered as examples of superb organization and logistics, and brilliant, innovative technology....

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The Price of Freedom

Many came … some had to stay.Approximately 150,000 men landed on the beaches of Normandy on D Day, June 6th, 1944. Approximately 4,500 were killed and another 5,000 wounded or missing. The overall casualty rate was 7%, with by far the highest losses suffered by...

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Firefight at Stützpunkt One-Oh

The D Day landings involved over 150,000 Allied soldiers and over 50,000 German defenders. Let’s look at what D Day was like for just 177 of those men… The coast of Normandy was heavily defended by a series of fortified positions and strongpoints, known to the German...

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The Battles of the Generals

SHAEF vs OB West The Battles of the GeneralsPatton, Bradley and MontgomeryVon Rundstedt and RommelD Day was fought between the Allied soldiers landing on the beaches and the German Wehrmacht soldiers manning the Atlantic Wall. Many thousands died. But the nature of...

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The D Day Beaches

The price of freedom “Two kinds of people are staying on this beach: the dead and those who are going to die. Let's get the hell out of here!”—Colonel George Taylor, 16th Infantry Regiment On June 6th, 1944, American, British, and Canadian forces landed on the beaches...

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